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MESSAGE BANKING: COMPARING PERCEPTIONS OF PEOPLE WITH MND, SIGNIFICANT OTHERS AND SPEECH LANGUAGE PATHOLOGISTS.

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The heavy burden of a MND diagnosis changes the reality of both the person diagnosed and the significant others involved.

Aim
To determine and compare the perceptions of people with MND (PMND), significant others (SO) and speech language pathologists (SLP) about message banking.

Method
A quantitative, multi group posttest-only design was utilized to obtain three groups of participants’ perceptions about message banking. The participants watched a video presentation about message banking and then completed a questionnaire about their perceptions towards message banking and the communication purposes for which message banking could be used.

Results
The results suggest that PMND and SO had low levels of awareness about AAC and message banking. SLP felt that they knew little about AAC and had low levels of awareness about message banking. AAC strategies were not widely recommended by SLP to PMND, and typically included only gestures, letter boards or communication boards. Participants agreed that message banking was a good idea but PMND and SO had conflicting views about their personal interest in message banking. SLP showed interest in doing message banking with PMND.

Messages about in 1) needs and wants; 2) social closeness, 3) social etiquette 4) sharing information were chosen as important for message banking. SO thought messages of social etiquette were less important than that of sharing information.

Conclusion
Participants agreed about their awareness and perception about AAC and message banking. There were however differences about interest in message banking and the categories of messages that were important to bank.

Author(s):

Imke Oosthuizen    
Centre for Augmentative & Alternative Communication (CAAC) University of Pretoria
South Africa

Dr. Shakila Dada    
Centre for Augmentative & Alternative Communication (CAAC) University of Pretoria
South Africa

Prof. Juan Bornman    
Centre for Augmentative & Alternative Communication (CAAC) University of Pretoria
South Africa

 

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