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Comparing AAC devices from low to high technology for children with developmental disabilities

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Aim: The first purpose was to explore if students with developmental disabilities (DD) could learn to request preferred items using one of three different AAC systems including two high technologies and one low technology and which AAC system is more effective for students with DD. The final purpose was to determine after learning if students with DD would have any preference for using AAC system over the others.

Method: Three participants were recruited from an elementary school. Three different AAC devices including two high-tech devices (iPad and V-Pen) and one low-tech device (Picture exchange; PE) were compared. A multiple-probe across participants design was adapted in this study including baseline, Intervention, Modified-Intervention, Follow-Up, and Preference Assessment.

Results: All three participants were tough via video modeling to communicate effectively for making requests with three AAC devices. One participant (Gary) reached criterion with all three AAC systems, while the other participant (Ken) reached upon a mean of 70% with two devices (iPad and V-Pen) and one (Sam) had learned to use iPad with moderate proficiency.

Conclusion: These findings indicates that children with DD can learn to use the SGDs, but only one participant can learn to use PE effectively. The present study results demonstrates that two of three students with DD could simultaneously learn to use high-tech devices, like only iPad and V-Pen, to make functional communication. We haven’t found the preference between three AAC modes; however, the possibility might be lack of preference or such assessment was not appropriately implemented.

Author(s):

Chun-Han Chiang    
National Taiwan Normal University
Taiwan, Province Of China

Rui-Cheng Hong    
National Taiwan Normal University
Taiwan, Province Of China

Ming-Chung Chen    
National Chiayi University
Taiwan, Province Of China

Ya-Ping Wu    
National Chiayi University
Taiwan, Province Of China

Chien-Chuan Ko    
National Chiayi University
Taiwan, Province Of China

 

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