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Prediction of Communication Risk Before 12 months with the ISCBS: Group Outcomes at 3 Years

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This study reports communication outcomes of infants given the Infant Social and Communication Behavior Scales (ISCBS) at 2-12 months, including both infants with presumed typical development and infants with known conditions at risk for complex communication needs (CCN). The ISCBS is a new dynamic play-based assessment being normed internationally that assesses preintentional communication skills in modality independent ways, suitable for children with any types of physical, sensory, cognitive, social, or other developmental impairments. The assessment incorporates both simple AAC and literacy activities, and scores infant behaviors in 12 modalities, including attention, reciprocity, engagement, speech, exploration, mastery, and affect. The assessment is intended both to predict communication risk factors from infancy to later childhood, and to assess and track progress of preintentional children of all ages who develop and express communication in atypical ways. Results indicate patterns of infant behaviors on the ISCBS that differed between infants who later (at 3 years) demonstrated language impairments, CCN, behavior or physical processing impairments, or autism at age three years from those who did not. No single pattern of impairment characterized all these disability risk groups in infancy. Instead, infants with different disability outcomes demonstrated significantly different risk characteristics from each other and from infants with typical development. Further research directions will be reported, including recruitment of international and multilingual sites for further norming of the ISCBS in other countries.

Author(s):

Cynthia Cress    
University of Nebraska-Lincoln
United States

Teresa Parrill    
University of Nebraska-Lincoln
United States

Janice Swanson    
University of Nebraska-Lincoln
United States

Cara Ullman    
University of Nebraska-Lincoln
United States

Julie Peterson    
University of Nebraska-Lincoln
United States

Amy Olson    
Duquesne University
United States

 

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